Category: Olympics

A/C Arrow Construction – How A/C Arrows are Made

A/C Arrow Construction – How A/C Arrows are Made

Aluminum carbon hybrid shafts sit at the pinnacle of archery arrow shaft performance. As the pioneer in the category Easton’s legendary A/C arrows have dominated target archery for decades. Since their introduction, Easton A/C shooters have taken every Olympic Championship, and every outdoor World Record across the globe. Precision, Made-in-USA quality, and cutting-edge technology combine […]

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Originally from Archery Tutorials - Easton Archery - Blog- Tips & Tricks about Archery.

New Olympic Qualification Process for Paris 2024 Announced

New Olympic Qualification Process for Paris 2024 Announced

First the good news. Even though the qualification round (which is now the official name for what used to be called the ranking round) takes place before the opening ceremony, Olympic records can be set in the round. Mixed teams will return after their debut at Tokyo. And the standard team round will be back, […]

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Originally from Archery Tutorials - Easton Archery - Blog- Tips & Tricks about Archery.

FAQ’s about Arrow F.O.C (Front of Center)

FAQ’s about Arrow F.O.C (Front of Center)

FOC, or Front of Center Balance, describes the percentage of the arrow’s total weight that is located in the front half of the arrow. The more weight that is located in the front half of the arrow, the more forward is the arrow’s center-of-balance, and the more stable the arrow flight- up to a limit. […]

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Originally from Archery Tutorials - Easton Archery - Blog- Tips & Tricks about Archery.

Easton Target Archery Podcast Reaches Milestone!

Easton Target Archery Podcast Reaches Milestone!

With millions of downloads, hundreds of thousands of listeners around the globe, and with every episode packed with archery news, tips, sport history and insider information, Easton’s Target Archery Podcast has over 160 episodes now available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and other popular podcast sites. Hosted by George Tekmitchov, past USA World Team recurve shooter, […]

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Originally from Blog – Easton Archery.

How To Choose The Right Archery Stabilizer

How To Choose The Right Archery Stabilizer

Choosing Stabilizers for the first time can be a daunting task, especially if you just entering the world of archery. World-class archer Steve “The Big Cat” Anderson offers his best buying advice and tips for finding the right Stabilizer for you.

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Originally from Blog – Easton Archery.

Tokyo: 21 days to go

Tokyo: 21 days to go

Three weeks until the ranking round begins (oh, and a little something called the opening ceremony) – time for a round up of everything that has appeared in the last week.

Pics via KAA


The KAA shared photos of the training venue they have set up at the national Olympic sport centre in Jincheon. As with several previous Olympics they have built a kind of facsimile of the finals arena for their charges to train on. The enormous expense this must have entailed gives an idea of the resources that go into protecting the biggest South Korean Olympic medal ‘banker’ of all. I guess it makes for good, very visual publicity for the NOC as well.

Although I was also wondering: is it really worth it? If you’re that good, shouldn’t you be able to turn up to any field and deliver the goods? I guess this piece of theatrical magic has worked so far, so they are hoping it will work again. And they can practice against each other; let’s face it, the chances of them having to compete against each other in the last three rounds are pretty high. Although this year, they seem to have skipped the traditional ‘training in a baseball stadium‘ which characterised previous buildups. There’s clearly a lot of tedious publicity work to be done.


Did you know you can donate directly to help Japanese athletesif you use Visa, they’ll match it. I wasn’t expecting things to be funded quite so directly.


Perhaps more NOCs have a digital begging bowl out. Over at Team GB, they seem to prefer you buy something from the gift shop. Having said that, these T-shirts are pretty boss:

They also have an ‘Archery’ T-shirt, with an extremely abstract design on the front. I guess it’s supposed to be a sight:


Despite a high-profile announcement re: spectators – the plan was to cap venue attendance at 50% of capacity or 10,000 – whichever is the greater – there now seems to still be a threat of holding the whole thing behind closed doors. The impact on archery wouldn’t be too great, the impact on the athletics stadium (capacity 68,000) will be enormous.

There will apparently be a final decision on Monday. This is on the back of mixed news re: COVID in Japan. A vaccination programme has finally started gaining momentum, although the famed ‘Delta variant’ seems to be going around already. Once it’s in, it’s not getting out. The worrying case of an athlete from Uganda testing positive on arrival in Japan, after apparently passing a COVID test and being fully vaccinated, is either an outlier or a worrying harbinger of what is to come in the next few weeks, as 60,000 or so athletes, journos, technicians, broadcasters, judges, coaches and federation wonks begin to descend on Tokyo. This bell-end isn’t helping, either. There was also some more news about beer and condoms.



Yahoo News! shared a piece detailing the privations that journalists will have to face when reporting from Tokyo; broadly, you’re not allowed to go anywhere or do anything at all, on pain of having your accreditation revoked and/or being thrown out of the country – not even walking. This will be enforced by a tracker app on your phone:



Daniel Castro has been selected for the single men’s spot for Spain. A lot of people thought that Pablo Acha would be going, as he is, y’know, the new European Champion, but apparently the selection was based on World Cup placings. Castro paid a lengthy tribute to Acha, and several other people on Facebook, which is a lovely read in translation.



Deepika Kumari (above, right) became the world recurve number one after her triple medal haul in Tokyo – for the first time since 2013. She takes over the number one spot from Lisa Barbelin, who had held it for, like, a month after her Euros triumph. She took over from Kang Chae Young, who has been there for a couple of years, I understand. World Archery have now added continental rankings as well. (This photo, taken by Dean for World Archery, is one of my favourites of the year.)



TeamGB are sending a 13-year-old to Tokyo, amid more rumblings about just how many less medals GB will be winning overall, after the record-breaking haul from Rio. There will actually be a slight overall increase in funding for the next cycle.



There has been a softening of the policy that forbade athletes to take young children “when necessary” to Tokyo. This is of course far too late to help the relevant parents and children, including Naomi Folkard, who had already made extensive plans:


National Olympic kits are being revealed, if they haven’t been already. I usually enjoy the quadrennial fashion sniping – and the apparently post-ironic Canadian kit needs discussing – but there’s something I really like about the South African kit. It looks so casual, and so.. normcore. It represents what a lot of us have been doing for a year: lounging around. It doesn’t feel the need for a grandiose national statement. It’s very on brand for right now.



More news next week.

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Easton X10 Shooters Take All Olympic Slots for Tokyo at Final Qualification Tournament

Easton X10 Shooters Take All Olympic Slots for Tokyo at Final Qualification Tournament

(Paris, France  June 21 2021) World Archery’s last-chance tournament for Tokyo Olympic Games qualification saw the final 51 countries qualify their shooters for the Olympic Games this week. In Paris, at the final qualification tournament, the USA men’s team of Brady Ellison, Jack Williams, and Jacob Wukie took the gold medal to cement the USA’s […]

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Originally from Blog – Easton Archery.

Hip Quivers and Field Quivers – What’s the Difference?

Hip Quivers and Field Quivers – What’s the Difference?

Hip Quivers and Field Quivers What’s the difference? A common question asked when archers are shopping for a wearable quiver – what is the difference between hip quivers and field quivers? The answer: not a whole lot – hence the reason for the confusion. Hip quivers and field quivers are both essentially hip worn quivers […]

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Originally from Blog – Easton Archery.

Tokyo 2020: 45 days to go

Tokyo 2020: 45 days to go


It’s 45 days to go before one of the strangest and most beleaguered Olympic Games of our lifetimes takes place.

For 95.5 percent of us, across the globe, watching it on TV is the only way we will ever experience it; just half a percent of the Olympic audience will ever see an Olympic event live. The TV audience is paramount, and the broadcasters have the final say on all kinds of things to do with the Summer and Winter Games. For many people watching; will it be very different? With the camera angles changed to de-emphasise just how few people are in the venues (exactly how many will be there is still unclear), and crowd noise undoubtedly dubbed on, it will be, for many people, a very similar experience.

Pic via https://news.abs-cbn.com/


The revenue generated from selling the TV rights funds the IOC, and (as the IOC very much like to point out) funds all kinds of Olympic sports too, including much of the operating budget of World Archery and many other national and international federations. Much of the Olympic sporting landscape in the modern era relies on this revenue, and ultimately the Olympics supports an ecosystem hundreds of thousands of jobs worldwide.

I don’t need to recount the events of the last 16 or so months; they have impacted every single one of us. The rescheduled Summer Olympics, delayed from 2020, were intended to be held in a world that had brought the COVID pandemic under control. When they were postponed, there was an optimism that Tokyo 2020 would go ahead in some kind of relative ‘normality’. Of course, that’s not the case. The Western world is a shifting mess of lockdowns, vaccination programs, third, fourth and fifth waves of variant viruses, quarantine procedures, strained public health systems, and all the rest that the coronavirus has dragged along with it on its never-ending journey around the well-connected world.

The Olympics ultimately relies on certainty; it’s an (almost) immovable feast. The incredulous full-steam-ahead response as the virus took hold in spring last year was only stopped by the announcement that many major nations would officially not send a squad, beginning the snowball process of unravelling and eventually postponement.

The IOC had good reason to be confident, apparently, the start time of an Olympic event has never moved before, and it has been 76 years since the last cancellation, due to war in 1944. Viruses had threatened before, and been found wanting.

The modern Games is now so big and so complicated and so expensive partly because it is has to begin on a particular date. Most large public projects are not delivered on schedule. The Olympics is, and if one aspect of it is not on track, the only solution is to throw immense amounts of resources at it until it is. Many aspects of Rio 2016, not helped by major budget problems and a general Brazilian disposition to do things at the last minute, were barely finished in time. (The 2016 Paralympics almost didn’t take place at all.)



As of this writing, a narrative has developed in the press that the Japanese government and the IOC are determined to press on with the Games in the teeth of a uncertain pandemic and hugely negative public opinion. Most people have cited a a poll originally commissioned by Kyodo News which showed that 35.3% of people were in favour of cancelling it, and 44.8% were in favour of postponing it once more. (Never mind that postponing it again has been categorically ruled out by all as politically, logistically, and financially impossible.) This has been conflated by several other media outlets as ‘80% of the Japanese public want Games cancelled.’ Public opinion not being behind the Games beforehand is a distinct feature of the recent Olympic landscape, London 2012 being a prime example. Opinion polls are not a good guide to Olympic futures.

Some more frenzied commentators have likened the IOC to an occupying army which is essentially holding Japan hostage and forcing it to hold the Games, its biggest cash cow, on pain of forfeiture contracts which will ruin it financially. The IOC has become the villain of the piece (or a lot of them).
Poor Japan may not particularly want to hold an Olympics this summer, but the alternative is having wasted countless billions. The options are to either tough it out in the face of grim opinion polls and a vocally annoyed population, or cancel and face even more political wrath, grim financial fallout and catastrophic loss of face.

The cynical take is that the Games are now being held not as the usual riotously expensive celebration of soft power, but as a contractual obligation, to save face and ensure the all-important contracted broadcast revenue appears and cascades through the system. Another, equally cynical way of looking at it is to say Japan has gambled and lost; its politicians eagerly signed up for the big dance hoping to gain personal prestige, a political legacy, national clout and long-tail tourist revenue, and due to an unforeseen global catastrophe, they’ve been left holding the baby. Tough luck Sato, old chum. There’s a bunch of runners turning up and they need a track to run on and somewhere to stay.

Most of the focus in the Japanese press is that the 60,000 or so athletes, journalists, technicians, broadcasters, judges, coaches and federation people will be bringing a bunch of coronavirus variants to their islands, turning the Olympics into a superspreader event. (Incidentally, this number of ‘essential personnel’ is down from the normal Olympic overseas attendance of around 180,000 – which gives you an idea of just how many hangers-on there are.)

None of these articles acknowledge the extensive steps being taken to specifically make sure that this is not the case, as detailed in the much-vaunted (but under-promoted) IOC ‘playbooks‘ for all attendees. No one going will be admitted into Japan if they haven’t had two doctor-certified negative COVID tests in the preceding three days. No one going will be allowed to go sightseeing, use public transport, go into a bar or a restaurant, or indeed, do anything apart from go between hotel and venue to work or compete. (Denied of all overseas revenue, Tokyo’s hoteliers and restauranteurs are unsurprisingly furious and are adding to the cancellation chorus.)

Rio fan zone. Probably be less of this going on.



The IOC hasn’t covered itself in glory here; sending John Coates, one of its blunter instruments, out to announce that the Games could be held even if Japan was under a state of emergency, which only ramped up the chorus to get rid of it. It seems like lot of the gung-ho rhetoric from all participants is to not let a single crack appear that might offer the ‘let’s-cancel-it’ mob a way in.

Also, none of the current press articles are also calling for the cancellation of the PGA, or Wimbledon, or the football Euros, or the Tour de France, or any of the many other sporting events due to take place this summer. None of them points out the large number of safe sporting events that have taken place without incident (none of which is as complex as an Olympics, of course). But voices as loud as the New York Times have decided to floridly jumped on the bandwagon: “The I.O.C. oversees the most pervasive yet least accountable sport infrastructure in the world. The group appears to have fallen under the spell of its own congenital impunity. Pressing ahead with the Olympics risks drinking poison to quench our thirst for sport. The possibility of a superspreader catastrophe is not worth it for an optional sporting spectacle.”

Perhaps the most bitter take has come from Japanese Olympic Committee member Kaori Yamaguchi who has weighed in that Japan been “cornered” into staging the Olympic and Paralympics, even as she conceded that they would be going ahead:


“Were not the Olympics supposed to be a festival of peace? … It begins with tenaciously engaging in dialogue with people who hold diverse views. If we abandon this process, then the Olympics have no meaning.”

“The opposite of peace is a hard-line, stubborn approach based on the view that ‘people may be saying all kinds of things, but once the Olympics start it’ll be fine. What will these Olympics be for and for whom?”

“I believe we have already missed the opportunity to cancel. It would require too much energy to make and follow through with such a decision. We have been cornered into a situation where we cannot even stop now.”

“We are damned if we do, and damned if we do not.”



The problem is that “engaging in dialogue with people who hold diverse views.” is a very reasonable thing to do during the bidding and planning phase of a Games. When the chips are down and you’ve got to execute the operational phase, that’s exactly what you don’t do. It’s such an immense and complicated thing, involving such Brobdingnagian logistics and hundreds of thousands of people, it’s either go or no-go. The big circus that everybody enjoys on their TV every two or four years comes about because of the boring stuff involving spreadsheets and trucks and warehouses and accountants and shipping manifests and scaffolders and electricians and technicians and builders which takes seven years to organise. The die is cast for Tokyo. You’re either helping it to be a safe, successful event, or you’re not. It’s either fully underway, or not at all. It can’t pause.

So it’s happening. Personally, I believe it will be safe; not being a public health expert, I can’t stake my reputation on it.

But Yamaguchi is right about one thing; in the Faustian pact that the Japanese government has got itself into, something will be missing from the whole thing: who will these Olympics be for? Japan may be dammed either way, but it still has a chance to detoxify.

With just a few weeks to go in Rio, the prediction from all sides was that it would be a disaster, with the blame laid at Rio’s door. In the end, despite a couple of small mishaps, the Games went ahead as planned, and the TV audiences were healthy. (A huge number of volunteers quit in Rio as well, same as is happening now.) But this situation feels different. It is not business as usual. If the IOC and the Japanese don’t get this absolutely right, it risks the entire circus going into long-term decline, if audiences are turned off.

An announcement was made this week about the podiums, part of the fully overshadowed publicity buildup. A tiny corner of the Olympic design world, made of recycled plastics, it was a representation of the minimalist (if conservative) design style that has characterised these Games, long before coronavirus upended everything. I think they are smart and modern and forward-looking, and normally I love this kind of design minutiae that adds to the flavour of the whole dish. But recycled podiums are not what is needed right now.



What is needed right now is to win the hearts and minds of the Japanese and wider public, indeed the whole world. To convince people that they are worth doing. This is going to take some humility on behalf of the IOC and some brilliant PR from the Japanese government. Neither has shown a great deal of aptitude for either of these recently. And there’s only a month and a half left.


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A Century of Easton Factories

A Century of Easton Factories

For 100 years, the Easton family has strived to create the world’s best archery products in the USA.  Over the decades, with extremely humble beginnings, Easton has progressed through a succession of manufacturing facilities and today, the largest dedicated archery factory in the world continues to produce arrows in Salt Lake City, Utah.    The […]

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